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Cylinder Selection
Cylinder Options
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Cylinder Selection

Selecting Cylinder Bore Size

When selecting a cylinder bore size for your application, first determine the maximum push or pull force required. Next, add at least 10% to the push/pull force or the working pressure to compensate for pressure drop in the line and friction in the cylinder. This 10% figure is adequate for normal applications. Finally, knowing the working pressure available, select your cylinder bore size.

Selecting Cylinder Rod Diameter

Standard Rods - Standard rods can usually be selected when a cylinder is used for a pull or tension application. In some applications where long stroke cylinders are used for pull or tension, oversize rods may be required to eliminate rod sag.

Oversize Rods - Oversize rods are often required when a cylinder is used in a thrust or push application. In these applications, the designer must treat the piston rod as a column in compression and specify a rod large enough to prevent rod buckling.

Rod Diameter Selection

To determine the correct rod for your application, follow the steps listed below: (it is a good idea to print these out so you don't have to scroll as much)

  1. Determine the load or maximum thrust required.
  2. Classify your application as one of the various mounting types.
  3. Determine stop tube length--see stop tube instructions.
  4. Determine the value of "L" for your application with the rod fully extended. (See dimensional chart below)
  5. By referring to chart, select a thrust figure from the left-hand column, equal to or greater than the thrust of your application.
  6. Scan to the right of the thrust figure selected until an "L" value is equal to or greater than the "L" value determined above.
  7. Follow the "L" value column to the top of the chart to find the recommended rod diameter.
  8. In some cases, the recommended rod diameter may be larger than is available in the bore size selected. In this case, a larger bore size should be selected.

 
Thrust Load in Lbs. Values of "L" in Inches ****** Thrust Load in Lbs Values of "L" in Inches
Piston Rod Diameters Piston Rod Diameters
5/8 1 1 3/8 1 1/2 5/8 1 1 3/8 1 1/2
100 75 191     1600 19 48 90 108
150 61 156     1800 18 45 85 102
200 53 135 255   2000 17 43 81 97
250 47 121 228   2200 16 41 77 92
300 43 110 208 250 2600 15 38 71 85
350 40 102 193 232 3000 14 35 66 79
400 38 96 180 217 3500 13 32 61 73
450 35 90 170 205 4000 12 30 57 68
500 34 86 161 194 5000 11 27 50 61
600 31 79 147 177 6000 10 25 47 56
700 28 72 137 164 7000 9 23 43 52
800 27 68 128 154 8000 8 22 41 49
900 25 64 120 145 9000   20 38 45
1000 24 61 114 138 10000 19 36 43
1200 22 55 104 125 12500 17 32 38
1400 20 51 97 116  



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stop Tubes

A stop tube is a spacer placed between the piston and the rod end head to reduce bearing loads. The reduction in bearing load is done by increasing the distance between bearing surfaces.

Stop tubes are recommended for mounting types I and II any time the "L" dimension of that application exceeds 40".

Stop tubes are normally not required with mounting types III and IV but the designer should use his own discretion to keep bearing loads to a minimum. Stop tubes should be specified at a rate of 1" for every 10", or fraction thereof, over an "L" dimension of 40".

Adjust "L" dimension by adding stop tube length when using "L" to determine rod diameter.

Note: Increasing rod diameter to reduce bearing load is not recommended. Stop tubes are more effective and generally more economical.

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